Behind The Grape-Wall Of China

Kamary Phillips•Indie Wino
Do I really want a bottle of wine with a stamp, MADE IN CHINA on it? Even if it’s, good?

It’s no real secret that many wine producers are betting the future of wine on the Chinese market. This notion is growing just as much as, well, China itself is. It should certainly come to no surprise that the Chinese have discovered an appetite for Wine and of course they know how to make it. What DON’T they know how to make?

BEHIND THE GRAPE-WALL OF CHINA
My position on this subject is most certainly based Politically, Nationalistic, and Economical. As for the Culture, to each their own though I couldn’t imagine eating a lot of the things you see sold at markets. 🙂

Behind The Grape Wall Of China

Contrary to my other global, human counterparts, I for one am not a big fan of Chinese manufacturing, in general. I guess that’s because the majority of products I personally encounter in my daily life adorning a MADE IN CHINA stamp or sticker on it, are crap. Actually, CRAP.

So, if you’re listening CHINA, if your plan is simply to crank out bizillions of watered down, tasteless bottles of “Wine”, do the world a big favor and stay out of the vineyard. I’ve yet to taste a brilliant Chinese beer, for example, though I see them popping up everywhere here. Now that China has an official middle-class citizenship, no idea how big that is, production is clearly about quantity, not quality and we continue forking the money over. Well, not we. I’m truly am one of those guys to give an American product a chance first, followed by a German one. Vice versa when I’m abroad. Are there not enough Chinese people in China to market too? Oh, forgot, the majority are still poor by comparison.

At present, the export sales to most countries are weak, but China will undoubtedly find their way to your dinner table. Let’s hope they at least adhere to wine making best practices. I’d hate to discover some strange, fancy new chemical being added for color and taste which causes children to be born with 5 limbs. You’ll never know, until you know. Bought any playthings for your toddlers that were made in China lately? DON’T.

Current figures do suggest that China is now the biggest export market for Bordeaux wine, ahead of the UK, though I don’t know the validity of those figures. For those who want to know more about China and about how wine is sold and understood in China, there is a special blog in that very subject. It is written by a Chinese journalist living in France, Jia Peng, so it is in French. Use Google Translate or something to understand the basics. It’s called Le Marché du Vin en Chine. I for one, am far too lazy.

No, with my limited funds I will continue to support Wines and winemakers I can trust and a bit closer to home. Any huge Chinese wine fans out there, feel free to send us a bottle of your best. I’ll review it along with another more experienced Palate and I’ll be happy to admit being wrong minded. Until then, I’m anti-Chinese manufacturing, no matter what the hell it is. Wine production should not be a mega-mass produced, numbers game. But that’s just me. What do I know, I’m just an American wino with European citizenship who doesn’t knowledgeably support any country that still executes it’s citizens on the streets nor respects the rights of animals. I could go on…

Viva Sonoma!

Cheers,
K.

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